Imagery gallery day

Had a blast up at Imagery Estate Winery in Sonoma on Sunday. Got to sign wine bottles and prints of my original painting, which is on view in the gallery (it's behind glass, presumably because it's right next to the tasting room - in case anyone gets too crazy!).

StARTup Art Fair: Video & Photos from Room 321

The StARTup Art Fair was an exhilarating success! Over the course of the 3-day art fair, my fellow exhibitor, Shannon Amidon, and myself gave away hundreds of cards and talked to close to a thousand people about our art. Here's a video of our room on Day 1:

The Fair takes place at Hotel del Joie in the Marina District of San Francisco. It was a gorgeous, sunny weekend, which helped bring out a record number of attendees. We transformed our regular hotel suite into a gallery by moving all the furniture, papering the walls, bringing additional lights and hanging our work without nails - it's magic! It was a lot of work, but well worth it. You can see a big of our process in this slideshow:

I couldn't have asked for a better exhibition partner! We were honored to have both been selected off our joint exhibition proposal, Seeking Harmony, a theme which really resonated with many of our audience. 

Shannon Amidon & Christine Rasmussen at StARTup Art Fair, San Francisco, 2017. 

Shannon Amidon & Christine Rasmussen at StARTup Art Fair, San Francisco, 2017. 

Oh yes, and we got some press coverage too:

I'll be posting more about the couple of new series I debuted at the event soon, so stay tuned.

You can purchase Shannon's work here and mine here.


A Few Kids' Art Projects From Me to You

The last couple of weeks have been incredibly busy with a lot of transitions for me, so I haven't been painting. I have, however, been teaching art to some really great 1st and 4th graders.  Here's some 1st graders "3-D aquariums" made from paper plates, a project I got from Tim Sensai, instructions here. Aquariums2

And here's a 4th grader's "blow painting" - made by blowing watered down paint across the paper with a straw. While most kids made abstract pieces, she turned hers' into a tree!

Kendra's Blow Painting

I can't remember who told me about this project, but it's a very simple project that is fun for a range of ages and yields satisfying results. This can be a great way to introduce kids to abstract art and/or you can use these colorful papers as backgrounds for other projects.

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Lastly, here's a 2-day project called "Painted Tropical Birds", which I found here.  It sounds deceptively simple, but it's interesting how when there are more than twenty 6 year old kids in the room, you have to be very specific with instructions. Everyone had fun, though, and the results were great!

Painted Birds

While I have decided to take an indefinite hiatus from the madness of teaching children, I do have to admit that kids are awesome!

One Billion Rising - Global Dance Movement 2/14/13

Happy Valentine's Day! Actually, I am not a big proponent of said holiday, but I am a supporter of V-Day - the global movement to end violence again women and girls. Started 15 years ago by Eve Ensler -- also the playwright of the well-worth  watching Vagina Monologues -- this year there is a new campaign called One Billion Rising that encourages a global dance party to support the safety of women. You can watch live performances on their website, go to a local event or join in! Here's a shout-out to my fellow artists Dhol Rhythms Dance Company who are performing at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, check out the details here.

Cindy Sherman shows her face(s) at SFMOMA

I find it very interesting and informative to see the arc of an artist's entire career, and it's a rare event among contemporary artists unless the artist has the good fortune of having a retrospective show.  The Cindy Sherman exhibit on view at the SFMOMA through October 8th affords such an opportunity by displaying her work from 1975 to present.  What really struck me about Sherman's arc is her remarkable consistency in subject matter. While I might get bored or frustrated with a subject and move on to the next thing, Sherman seems to delve deeper and find another way to represent her subject.  She does this through innovative portraiture, including simulating movie stills and Old Masters' paintings. All of her work has to do with the portrayal of females - in art, the media, film, fashion, etc. - yet her manner of doing this is subversive by her being both the (heavily disguised) model and the photographer.     

Another interesting thing to me is that by portraying so many different "types" of female - the diva, the plain Jane, the 60s housewife, the socialite - Sherman herself defies being typecast and throws light on the fact that the way one looks does not make up one's identity. It also seems to reflect on how women see themselves; how we try to remain young, beautiful, sexy. Yet beneath all that make-up and plastic surgery, there's a whole other person.

 

I was really impressed with Sherman's devotion to her craft, which involves her expertise as a photographer in staging the scenario just right, but also her skills as a make-up artist, including the use of prosthetics, and as a method actor. Her attention to the details - making sure the tattoos, the painted on eyebrows and the freckles match her character just so - show her devotion to her craft.  It really is a remarkable exhibit.

  

One of my favorite pieces was actually an early one - a stop-motion video titled Doll Clothes (1975). It's simplicity belies it's ingenuity. As someone who grew up loving to play with paper dolls, there's a nostalgia Sherman taps into while also highlighting many of the themes she went on to explore in her later work. She has, impressively, come full circle,  and yet it's not over: I'm sure there's much more good work to come.